Rachel

End of Summer

End of Summer Checklist

  1. Walk barefoot in the grass
  2. Get an ice cream cone
  3. Listen to music outside
  4. Make a dish using zucchinis, tomatoes, eggplants, peppers from the Farmer’s MarketWP_20180916_14_10_29_Pro.jpg
  5. Watch the sun set
  6. Make one last pitcher of Sangria
  7. Hold tree pose
  8. Take a Saturday afternoon nap
  9. Flip through a magazine sipping iced tea
  10. Ride the carousel even if you’re way too big for itWP_20180822_15_40_23_Pro.jpg—Rachel
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Rachel

A New Rhythm

scenic view of forest during night time
Photo by Hristo Fidanov on Pexels.com

Nearly half our guests left the lake house this afternoon. The kids’ room—with the bunk beds (two now stripped)—felt particularly lonely for the rest of the day. After dinner was too quiet at first, then too loud when my kids started bickering, play-fighting, trying to fill in the emptiness.

I wish they could have stayed, but there is a new rhythm taking shape for these last few days. As the light went down, the sky turned blue then black, I read out loud from Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor, something I’d thought about doing for days (years?) but until now, with all the happy activity, had never gotten the chance to do.

Rachel

Early morning at the lake

seaport during daytime
Photo by Pok Rie on Pexels.com

Hanging on the wall at this lake house where we are staying for a luxurious two weeks, there is a sign that provides the “Lake Rules”—swim, relax, sleep in. Despite torrents of rain, at times unrelenting, far more rain than not rains so far, we have managed to swim just about every day. Relax, absolutely, and even sleep in. My kids are old enough now (10 and 5), far too attached to their cousins (14 and 13), deliriously happy in the playroom, to care much about waking me up anymore. And so, for the first time that I remember since entering parenthood, I am waking up when I choose to on vacation. That has meant sleeping in until 8, generally, and—after a particularly bad night with my younger up and sick for several hours—even until close to 10.

That extra sleep I surely needed, yet now feel ready to return—if not to the early, early mornings of vacations past—to awaking early enough to greet the morning.

The air is wet, so the matches won’t light. It takes me seven tries. I stretch out a beach towel, and practice four sun salutations, taking deep, slow breaths (but continuously needing to remind myself to do this, even during yoga, even during these moments alone). I had wanted to hang the suits and towels on the porch, hoping they’d catch one of the rare moments of sun, but everything out there is still wet.

So many ways to enjoy the magic of this early morning at the lake. So much that feels possible now that somehow doesn’t for much of the rest of the day. Practicing yoga. Sipping coffee and staying at the water. Reading the book I brought, The Point of Vanishing, by Howard Axelrod, sent to me two years ago from my dear friend Matt in Seattle. Take quiet, nothing notes in my journal. Attempt to write something semi-coherent here. Take a walk. A quick little swim. Anything at this hour feels more purposeful, more imbued with meaning. The angle of the light, the solitude, the quiet, the invitation of another day.

Yesterday I practiced tree pose  in public, accepting that to improve, to expand my practice, I will need to be like the Chinese ladies in Chinatown, practicing Guang Chang Wu and various martial arts in an empty basketball court every morning. Inward focus, no matter the setting.

Now, as I am attempting to stay balanced in tree pose, an animal appears in the field across the street. It is a deer, gracing me with its presence. I feel this is a sign I am still enough, like Annie Dillard in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.

Now, coming out of tree pose, out of my yoga sequence, folding up my “mat” and pouring a cup of coffee, I notice various sounds—birds, a dog barking, a plane maybe overhead, insects buzzing, I’m never sure which ones. Someone starts stirring upstairs, the kids are growing louder, probably getting hungry and ready for breakfast.

The air here is enchanted, the lake rules easy to follow, but “sleep in” is one I’ll ignore as many days as I can.

—Rachel